Man-O-War


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Neerijnen
2006
Terrazzo, pavers, bronze, 15 x 12 x 1.40 meter
'The sun is shining. A shadow moves across the Mc Cammon Square. A journey in time with the unspoken wish that they were flying home.'
In World War II, hanging from a parachute, eight of the ten crew members were killed when they jumped out of their B-17, named the Man-O-War. They were returning from a mission to Germany, were attacked by a German fighter and crashed. The average age of the Americans was 22 years.
On May 4, 2006 the pilot John Bruce and the widow Bonney Jean McCammon unveiled the tail on the shadow of the 'flying fortress' the B-17, the A 124 399-V.
The number associated with the device called Man-O-War, and is closely linked to the identity of the young crew. On the helm is a plaque with their names.
The silhouette of the B-17 was a common phenomenon at the end of World War II.