Neue Wilde is fucking with Cubism


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2015
reinforced concrete
Following the visit to the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris
While you have to pay for national museums such as the Louvre and the Centre Pompidou, the city museums are free. The Musée d'Art Moderne in Paris has a lot of work originating from the city itself.
You walk straight into a small gallery of Fauvism and Cubism; Braque, Picasso and Georges Rouault. My attention is drawn to statues of Jacques Lipchitz; three-dimensional cubism. We admire his ‘Danseuse’ from 1913.
Then we reach the galleries of the New Realists, Fluxus and the German scene. The German gallery contains predominantly works by Penck (1939). AR Penck, alias Ralf Winkler, became famous when I was still at art college. This modern art teacher showed his paintings and sculptures which are based on primitive representations of humans and animals and totem-like forms. He is considered part of the Neue Wilde movement, like Georg Baselitz. I see he has properly indulged himself. The fun he has had in making the sculptures and paintings is immediately obvious. My hands begin to itch. Jacques Lipchitz with the graceful cubist women and AR Penck with his coarse totem figures, a Lithuanian and a German in a Paris museum with black images. There are dozens of different art forms to admire in the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, and in every form sexuality is foremost. There is no museum without sexual artistic expression. An idea begins to form that I want to bring several different art forms together. There is an endless stream of artistic styles on museum visits, on the Internet, in brochures and in schools. This is sectarianism. I have wanted to drop that sectarianism since my childhood. I can count one hundred and thirty European art movements on Wikipedia, and I have not even included concretism. In visual arts, it is barely enough to determine which works have limitations,  and which different sections can flow together or overlap. There will always be avant-garde and expressionism, figurative, abstract or non-figurative. Everything is possible but nothing is compulsory.
Photo 2: Jaques Lipchitz Danseuse, 1913, Musée d’art moderne de la ville Paris
Photo 3: A.R.Penck 1987 Musée d’art moderne de la ville Paris